Home > Uncategorized > The White Monks

The White Monks

Shubham Anand, one of this year’s Skoll Scholars, shares his thoughts as he begins his MBA in Oxford.

Three White Monks by MASSON Henri Léopold

It is a universal human quest to search for a grand unifying theory. The physicists are almost there with the recent discovery of the Higgs-Boson or the God particle. Prof Fritjof Capra in his famous book “The Tao of Physics” takes it still further and asserts based on his deep personal experience that both physics and metaphysics ineluctably lead to the same conclusions. Similarly, in almost every field of knowledge scholars and practitioners alike constantly strive to reach that one point on the evolutionary continuum where everything merges into oneness. Some call it Nirvana.

There is however one notable exception, the field of Business Management. Here the dichotomies are very stark. Very ironic for a field that is essentially a melting pot of various disciplines. There is a constant tension between social, environmental and financial goals. The frameworks to integrate these differing objectives are still at a very nascent stage. The corrective endeavours have just begun.

Why is it so particularly important to find the common ground? Why bother? The existing MBA community collectively controls resources worth hundreds of billions of dollars and the future MBAs will eventually control even greater amounts. They exercise an enormous influence over governments worldwide. The decisions they take affect millions of people across the globe. The financial crisis of 2008 has shown how their actions have the power to even derail world economies and as they say with great powers come great responsibilities.

The question is does a common ground really exist? My initial conversations with my SBS classmates give me a sense that everyone is more or less grappling with this question. Often these discussions bring up issues of values, priorities, passions, complexity and more. There are obviously no easy solutions but perhaps the answer, to the challenge of finding the common ground, lies buried deep in the gardens of Saїd Business School. This is perhaps the best kept secret of this wonderful institution.

The land where the Saїd Business School stands was once, the seat of higher learning for monks belonging to the Cistercian Order, called the Rewely Abbey or the Royal Monastery. Its inmates were famously known as the White Monks.

How does this relate to the world of business management? That is an enigma which we must collectively resolve over the course of this year. The answers may surprise, enrich and profoundly influence the very core of one’s being!!!

Categories: Uncategorized Tags: ,
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.