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Ready, Set, Go! Launching the Sustainable Development Goals

Oxford’s Fierce Compassion – Series of Student Insights to the Skoll World Forum 2016.

MBA student and Skoll Scholar Sumit Joshi gives his perspective on the Skoll World Forum seminar session ‘Ready, abortion Set, view Go! Launching the Sustainable Development Goals’.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were launched in September 2015. The key theme of these goals is world transformation – a development that necessitates tighter integration of efforts among international institutions, national governments, and corporate, social, and philanthropic actors.

Sumit

At the onset of panel discussion on SDGs in the Skoll World Forum 2016, Ray Suarez, Journalist and Author and the moderator of the discussion raised the question about the master agenda of SGDs. Elizabeth Cousens, Deputy CEO, UN Foundation and one of the panelists clarified that SDGs embrace a comprehensive approach to sustainable development issues and carry on the momentum generated by the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).  While MDGs expired in 2015, there was “unfinished business”, she proclaimed. There has been a lot of debate around the adequate number of SDGs, and so a balance between focus and breadth of these goals is critical. The 17 SDGs span a wide array of issues such as eradicating poverty, improving health and education, and ensuring equality, but these objectives require a balance among environment, economics, and society and also their nexus.

Panelist Michael Green, Executive Director, Social Progress Imperative stressed upon the fundamental difference between MDGs and SDGs. While MDGs were targeted at improving the social and living conditions of people in poor or developing countries, SGDs are more ambitious. Although SGDs relied upon the traction that MDGs had achieved, they reap the benefit of the period of economic growth. Furthermore, SDGs are globally more collaborative than MDGs in that MDGs were largely determined by OECD countries and other donor agencies while SDGs are holistic and also measurable.

The other panelists Dhananjayan Sriskandarajah, Secretary General, CIVICUS and Jane Griffiths, Company Group Chairman Janssen EMEA, Janssen-Cilag Ltd. corroborated Green’s view that SGDs have broader audience. Sriskandarajah criticised MDGs for being too technocratic and having narrow scope of development. He further emphasised, “one of the most important things that will be critical to the success of SDGs is to popularise the goals and make sure that everyone everywhere does recognise that this is a framework that belongs to them.” According to Griffiths, MDGs did not engage the entire population of the world. SDGs are more inclusive and just and also engage the private sector and general citizens far more than MDGs did.

The year 2015 provided policy makers and citizens with a great opportunity of formulating the next global development agenda. MNCs and private players will have a major role to play to make these goals more inclusive. The new goals are based on sustainability. Therefore, the key consideration for the policy makers is not to update the MDGs but rather draft new sustainable agenda. The commonality of interest for all countries and people is critical to setting up a package of comprehensive goals rather than individual and immeasurable ones. What needs to be verified in 2030 is whether SDGs are able to serve as an accountability framework from the government that encourages participation of private sector and civil society.