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The News We Need

Oxford’s Fierce Compassion – Series of Student Insights to the Skoll World Forum 2016.

MBA student Matthew Robertson gives his perspective on the Skoll World Forum seminar session ‘The News We Need’.

Thursday’s panel ‘The News We Need’ opened with a lighthearted nod, initiated by moderator Jess Search of BRITDOC, to Anas Aremeyaw Anas, Ghana’s intrepid undercover reporter who conceals his identity behind a mask. Anas, one of the panelists, has been working diligently to unearth corruption and criminality in Africa. That has to qualify as fierce compassion. For anyone who did not have the time or good fortune to attend the panel, I highly recommend that you learn more about Anas’ work. You should also check out “rage boy” – but more on that later.

Anas, who is the founder of Tiger Eye Media, defined journalism as “pursuing the truth that emanates from the people and leads to progress.” He added that his unorthodox approach is a product of his society and is needed in order to hold those in power to account, like thirty-four Ghanaian judges facing indictments on corruption thanks to Anas’ two-year long investigations. “There’s no point,” he said, “in doing journalism that doesn’t benefit society.”

Zoe Williams, a columnist for The Guardian, tackled the always-hot topic of the ideological tension between progressive and conservative media, commenting that the liberal media isn’t responding well enough to the negative messages being propagated by conservative media. It was clear through the audience comments and questions that political and ideological tension, at the editorial and corporate levels of the media, are top of mind.

Wajahat Ali, Creative Director of Affinis Labs, explored the stereotypical and fear-based narratives propagated today in our news, including those around Muslims and Islam. He drove home the point by highlighting the case of Shakeel Ahmad Bhut, aka rage boy, a Kashmiri activist whose angry image, shown myriad times in the news has become the media face of Islam. Keeping the mood light with a sprinkling of humour, Ali also delved into the subjects of the news coverage of the US presidential election and water sanitation crisis in Flint, Michigan.

Dallas Morning News reporter Dr. Seema Yasmin used the example of American news media treatment of the Ebola outbreak to highlight the ethical failings present in news reporting. Dr. Yasmin pointed out that the mass media in the US did not jump on the story until there were cases in the US and threats to Western Europe, and even then the situation was presented as a threat to the West as opposed to a humanitarian health crisis in Africa. She added that newsrooms today don’t look like society and that increased diversity would doubtlessly enhance the value and depth of news.

On the subject of the need for diversity, an identifiably conservative voice on the panel would have added some useful perspective. After all, diversity goes beyond gender, ethnicity and socio-economic background, it includes viewpoints and ideology as well.

Finally, for social entrepreneurs and their networks, the news helps to frame their passion and directs society’s attention. While fear is all too prominent in today’s headlines, there’s still a vibrant market for hopeful stories. In some cases, it might require some minor investigating of our own, but the reward of inspiration is well worth the effort.