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Diversifying myself at Oxford

How does one judge whether this year has been a successful one or not? Have we been able to achieve things we wanted to from this year? Have we picked up the skills that we thought we would like to? Have we found the jobs that we wanted to?

These are big questions and they are not easy to answer. But one thing on which most of my class agrees is that this has been one of the best years of our lives. There are no two ways about it.

What is the one thing that we are going to take away from this year? For me, and it would be the conversations – both within and outside the classroom. I believe that the person who does the listening in these conversations is the one who derives the most value from them. These conversations with people from across the globe and across industries have broadened my professional and personal perspectives. Furthermore, in our classes and study groups, the diverse approaches of my classmates towards problem solving, almost always so different from mine, has enabled me to learn from different ways of thinking and approaching challenges. One of the main ways I have grown this year is in my ability to have conversations about multiple business disciplines and industries. There are many who would cite this kind of growth as a highlight of their MBA – and I have certainly found this to be true in my own case.  I consider it a privilege to have lived this year in Oxford and to have grown in this way.

One thing which I have come to realise is the power of networks, rather than just networking. The people we have met this year and the relationships that we have fostered are going to stay with us. These are the people who are going to go and manage large corporations and build successful startups, and we will need each other at different points in our lives. In order to reap benefits from the network that we have built this year, it is very important to be conscious of how people perceive you. Do they have fond memories of you from a conversation, an event or a dinner? And when you drop a note 10 years down the line to one of them, these memories and how they thought of you back will stand out. I would like to believe that if, at the end of the year, many classmates perceive me as a friend – as someone they would love to hear from even 10 years down the line – then I have succeeded in my MBA.