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Aha! Moments: When I Changed Course

 Forging Common Ground – Series of Oxford Student Insights to the Skoll World Forum 2017.

University of Oxford DPhil student, Luiz Guidi, gives his perspective on the  Skoll World Forum session “Aha! Moments: When I changed course”.

What is the secret to having a good idea? How do those moments of inspiration happen?

For Albert Einstein, the answer lied in thinking in completely different terms as, according to him, “no problem can be solved from the same consciousness that created it.” Searching for inspiration, some people have used psychedelic drugs to let their minds enter new dimensions including, allegedly, a certain Steve Jobs. At the Skoll World Forum yesterday, we decided to time travel using, not drugs (as far as I know), but through personal histories.

Josh Babarinde (Cracked It) take us back to his “aha!” moment.

Josh Babarinde (Cracked It) take us back to his “aha!” moment.

In an inspiring session, six speakers took us back in time and along their journeys of discovery and realisation, through those moments when something clicked in their brains and—aha!— they came up with a solution to the problem they were faced with.

Kennedy Odede (Founder & CEO, Shining Hope for Communities) told us his deeply moving story of struggle and forgiveness in Kibera, and how overcoming the suffering of a friend’s death and a football made him realise how he had to empower himself to help shape the lives of those in his community. Josh Babarinde (Founder and CEO, Cracked It) gave us an insight into how working directly with young offenders in London made him realise the potential for turning their existing social entrepreneurial skills in crime into something positive and desirable for them using technology. Ruth M’Kala (Alum, Global Health Corps) shared her tale of inspiration by the philosophy of justice and human rights, and how that enabled her to unlock her inner motivation to work towards promoting health as a human right.

Building on this, Chuck Slaughter (Founder, Living Goods) told us about how serendipitous encounters and conversations can lead you down to unexpected paths and to discoveries, and about the importance of testing these ideas quickly and cheaply—like when he became an “Avon lady”. Randomness and surprise were also a theme in Julia Ormond’s (Founder & President, Asset Campaign) story, as she realised that things are often very different than you think. For Julia, we must always ask ourselves: what is our own personal contribution to those faulty lines out there? Christine Su (CEO and Co-Founder at PastureMap) told us her history with cheese and how it put her in conflict, physically through causing her hives but also emotionally and ethically with realising how much of our food is still produced.

The connecting theme about all the ‘aha-ness’? It has nothing to do with training your brain or brainstorming playing in climbing walls. Instead, it is by simply being on the front line, experiencing things personally, feeling it for yourself. Through that, not only you can really deeply understand the problem, but you let serendipity play its role. By working directly with the people or the problems at stake, living it in the flesh, our speakers ended up stumbling upon an idea. As Chuck Slaughter put it, “we have a lot less control over our own path than we think.”

But, whilst this session was especially dedicated to it, ‘aha’ moments were everywhere in the Skoll World Forum. Moments of vision and insight have been shared by many throughout the week. And, hopefully, it provided a platform for many other moments of enlightenment, be it fuelled by inspiring stories, exchanges over coffee during the day, or random late night encounters over a beer—which, I suspect, many of us here today now regret drinking.

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