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Echale a tu Casa

Recent graduate of Oxford Saïd MBA 2015-16, Andres Baehr Oyarzun, spent his Summer Consulting Project in Mexico with 2015 The Venture finalist, Echale a tu Casa. Andres shares his story.

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“Echale, echale!”, screamed a child behind us, while we watched Mexico City’s Lucha Libre. Chubby wrestlers kept slapping each other’s chests while we sat next to our supervisor. This was not your average MBA consulting project, I thought.

It was the first time we heard the word Echale outside of the context of ‘Echale a tu Casa‘, which can be translated as ‘Throw your Heart at your House”. Echale is Mexico’s first B Corp, a finalist in Chivas’ The Venture competition in 2015, and the recipient of the ‘Best of the World’ award by the Rockefeller Foundation. The organisation works to provide affordable housing through an innovative and effective model. We were in Mexico to help them prepare for releasing an investment prospectus – post- competition support that was financed by Chivas after Echale’s participation in The Venture. We hoped to learn more about an innovative social business model while using our skills to add value to the Echale team’s work.

And learn we did – the model works as follows: imagine you are a low-income homeowner in need of a new home or home improvement work. Due to lack of access to finance, you will usually be limited to making necessary changes to your home as your savings allow – on an ongoing/ ad hoc basis, rather than during a singular, planned project. In many cases this leads to substandard home conditions and overcrowding. With Echale’s model, families only have to finance and carry out 30% of their home construction and Echale helps them to complete the rest. By creating access to both a government subsidy and a credit service, Echale enables homeowners to complete a new home or improve an existing one, in a sustainable manner. The impact goes beyond housing. Families get access to financial advice and products, they are active participants in the building of their own homes and the environmental impact of home construction is reduced by the use of Echale’s eco-friendly construction materials.

We drove with Alejandra, Director of Promotion, into Jocotitlán, one of the rural communities where Echale operates. “I wasn’t too sure about social entrepreneurship” she said, “until I met Francesco (Echale’s CEO and a regional celebrity of sorts).  After speaking with him, I knew I wanted to be part of the team, so I contacted him again, and again, until he just said ok, ok, come work with us”. 50 houses have already been constructed in Jocotitlán and the team is aiming to construct 500 more. This is just a small portion of the 30,000 completed homes, 150,000 home improvements and more than one million lives already positively affected by Echale.

Alejandra pointed at the steel beams that can often be seen poking out from the roofs of half-constructed houses. “You see those? They call them the ‘beams of hope”, she said. “Owners leave the beams in case one day they can afford a second floor”.

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We visited Maria del Carmen, one of the homeowners who had recently moved to an ‘Echale’ house. She walked us around her old home. We looked at the blue cracked walls, dirty floors and pierced tin roof. The contrast with the tiled based and firm structure of the new house was remarkable. Maria represents one life improved, but a sea of homes is waiting to be built; in Mexico, an approximate 4.9 million families live in substandard housing.

After two weeks of bilingual Skype teleconferences, research, modeling and writing, we finally had to say good-bye to the Echale team.  During our last meeting with Francesco we felt a combination of sadness, gratitude and excitement.

“Social impact is like a quantum gate”, said Francesco and raised his palm. “Once you touch it, you can’t go back. Once you have experienced it, you can’t go back”.

We packed up our bags and made our way back to Oxford. Back in Mexico, the luchadores would keep slapping their chests, the beams of hope would still stand high and the Echale team would still be there, throwing their hearts at it.

The Venture is looking for social businesses from around the world that are using business to help create a better future, if you are interested in applying or know of someone who should, head to their site to learn more www.chivas.com/the-venture.

 

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A whole new world…

Deborah Owhin is an MBA Skoll Scholar of 2015-16, sale she has dedicated over 10 years towards achieving gender equality. After attending UN Commission on the Status of Women (CSW 57) in 2013, healing she realised the urgent need for men and women to learn and work together to prevent gender inequality. Deborah therefore started ‘Made Equal’ – a non-profit social initiative that engages, symptoms educates and empowers men and women to eradicate gender inequality. She describes here her experience of life and study at Oxford Saïd so far.

 

Having left formal education over 5 years ago the idea of becoming a full-time student again was exciting but also slightly daunting. How was I going to ensure that I could balance my ‘perfectionist’ traits with interacting with over 340 course mates, faculty, staff, career options, adoption of the SDG’s, my personal commitments to women and working across sub-Saharan Africa, keeping in touch with family and friends, and traveling.

 

Being a student again has pushed me outside of my comfort zone and has increased my ‘work streams’ by almost double. I thought I was busy prior to my matriculation at Oxford, however the masses of opportunities available to you as an Oxford student are unimaginable. From Oxford Union debates on ‘Does Feminism Need Rebranding’ and panels, to distinguished speaker lecture series such as the ‘Devaki Jain Lecture with Graça Machel’, to formal dinners where I got to introduce my friends from home to my new Oxford friends, conferences such as PowerShift hosted by Professor Linda Scott, workshops run by the Skoll Centre on negotiation skills, to seminars by Josh Levy on ‘Dads at work’ the list is endless.

 

The thing that I had not anticipated or put much thought into would be the quality of my lecturers inside and outside of the classroom. I was assigned an academic advisor at Oxford Saïd and one at my College both of which are perfect for my interest, background and growth areas. Coming from a small liberal arts university, Spelman College, I was accustomed to a small network of students which meant faculty and staff knew students by name. I never expected to find that at Oxford and due to the nature and demands of my course it added to my disbelief. However my interactions with faculty has been inspiring to share my past and work areas with them and to hear about their passions for different fields, research areas, and their own families which has truly helped to keep this whole ‘MBA’ experience real.

 

I have had the opportunity to meet with a number of faculty members some who are my current lecturers and some who are not. Each one has taken the time and made themselves available in the common areas or during office hours and have not only advised me on careers but on interpersonal relationships, their own personal bicycle mishaps, the importance of ‘pause’ and reflection, while encouraging me always to share my non private sector experiences and realities with my classmates.

 

So many ideas often need sounding boards; in my first month Professor Marc Ventresca advised me to try new things, things that I would not do or had not done before coming to Oxford. What great advice that is so simple…do something you have never done before. This was affirmed by a number of other faculty and staff who I engaged in conversations about electives. So I signed up to take a French course, something that I have always wanted to learn and granted I many not become fluent in the next year but it is a step in the right direction.

 

Starting this journey has been a whirlwind with great days and tougher days, but the new friendships and networks make it worth waking up and getting to class for 8.30am every day.

If given the chance would I still choose and MBA? Would I still choose Oxford? Would I still choose this year, a resounding YES. Why? Because I feel more excited about this journey months into the program than when I began this new world which poses endless possibilities for which I am truly humbled.

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Freedom of my spirit

Sumit Joshi is a Skoll Scholar on the Oxford MBA for 2015-16. He is the founder of APAART Education, malady an organisation that aims to bridge the gap between academia and industry.

“There I was, wearing ill-fitting shoes, loose pajamas, a plain T-shirt, and a tired smile. That morning I had woken up to scales tilting further East. I had become chubbier in the last three years – something I wasn’t proud of. And now, while I waited with my friends outside Trinity College, it dawned on me that in these three years I had completely forgotten something crucial: I had forgotten how passionate I was about climbing. I took a deep breath as images of The Himalayas flitted across my mind. I really missed home.

Just when I was about to turn around and make my way back to my student accommodation at Rewley Abbey, I heard Melissa shout, ‘There he is!’ I saw a young man on a bicycle approaching us. He had climbing gear tightly fastened onto the back of the bike, and I thought I spotted a climbing rope too. Instinctively, I stopped.

Giles (as he later introduced himself) parked his bike by the pole. Within a few minutes of our introduction, we found ourselves discussing things we were really passionate about – sports, culture, food and more. We walked down from Trinity to Oxford Brookes, acquainting one another with our lives outside of work and academic study. The rapport was natural. No well-rehearsed networking pitch or futuristic thoughts on how the economic growth of developing nations would affect the world. We were out there, simply talking about what we loved. It felt good to be ‘normal normal’ again.

By the time we reached Brookes, I felt an adrenaline rush in my body. With my steps turning into a sprint I entered the building with Giles right by my side. When I spotted the towering 30 feet climbing wall, I knew I was going to make my Oxford debut that day.

With a silly smile plastered all over my face I looked around. People were adjusting their gear; some were trying to climb a higher grade; there were a couple with crampons and slips while others were cheering on the ones making a climb.

When I moved closer to the wall I could hear my heart pounding. I would love to call it ‘pure thrill’, however I must admit, I was a bit nervous! It had been three years. I was out of practice and this was a new place with new people. I had to quickly build my confidence and get going.

As I prepared for the climb, I could hear people clapping and cheering. I took my first shot at a medium grade. I was cautious, reconfirming my strength at every step, my skill in handling the ropes, and my ability to remember the manoeuvres as I negotiated my way up. I kept reminding myself of the techniques and I soon realised I was doing fine. When I climbed back down, Giles was beaming. He encouraged me to take on the next challenge – this time it was grade 5+. I climbed that without a moment’s thought. And then the next, and the next – higher and tougher each time. After my 4th climb I decided to call it a day. Giles seemed impressed with my performance. And many people came up to me congratulating me for the effort. It felt great, after a long time.

That day I must’ve met 20 sports enthusiasts. Each one of us belonged to a different country, spoke a different language, and had lived a different life before coming to Oxford. But right there, at that moment none of it seemed important. There were smiles for jobs well done, genuine encouragement for failures, and support that promised we’d outdo ourselves the next time. We were simply absorbing the thrill of a sport, a common thread that bound us together.

The following day at the School was different. The once tired routine had become spirited; there was a spring in my step. And guess what? The next day I went gliding!”

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Be Inspired Films: Creating a Successful Crowdfunding Video

Lara Barbier is a writer/producer for Be Inspired Films, an award winning video production company aiming to bring great ideas to life and tell stories that matter through the creation of broadcast quality video and animation.

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So, you’ve got that kick-ass idea, and you’re ready to harness the power of crowd funding! That’s great. Crowdfunding is potentially a really powerful way for the average person or small organization to launch their music, game, film or product without the traditional finance and commercial backing that multi-nationals and corporations have. It can also be a great way to get people to support a cause.

However launching a successful campaign isn’t always straightforward, in fact, according to Crowdfunding Academy , around 60% of projects fail.  A successful campaign requires lots of planning, a well thought through timeline, some very important social media sharing triggers, a little bit of luck and – a killer video!

As Kickstarter succinctly puts, projects with a video are 50% more likely to succeed than those without, while John Vaskis an Indiegogo ‘Games Guru’ says that campaigns with videos raise, on average, 114 per cent more than those without.

VideoKnowHow_Logo 300dpiThe video is the elevator pitch – it’s going to tell your story and should entertain, but also make people care and want to be involved in the process – preferably by a pledge and/or by sharing your project with their friends.

It doesn’t matter if you’re recording on an iPhone or on a top-range DSLR – take time to plan your video before going anywhere near that shiny recording device.  Watch lots of other crowd funding videos, both successful and not, and think about why they did or did not work.

Once you’ve done your research you’ll want to write out a script and shot list, and practice what you’re going to say, so it sounds engaging and sincere. Reel SEO offers these five points as the backbone for the structure of your crowd-funding video:

  • About You
  • Your Project’s Story
  • Rewards
  • Possible Scenarios
  • Final Call-To-Action

We would probably add a couple of things to that. It can also be very powerful to clearly define the problem you are seeking to solve through what you are doing and then offer your solution, this can get people on board if they can identify with the problem. While it’s great to include possible rewards – don’t list them all! Pick your top two to three.

This leads to the next point – keep your video short and sweet.  You need to be respectful of your viewer’s time – and grab their imagination up front. As Entrepreneur.com points out, you have the rest of the project page to expand on the details, don’t try and cram it all into the video!

You don’t have to be the next Michael Bay to make a great video. According to Kickstarter, it doesn’t have to perfect, it just has to be you. That said, you do need your videos to be of a good enough quality to capture and keep the attention of your audience. Poor sound and lighting can be a big turn off, just as much as an unplanned, monotone speech.

But don’t be afraid to try out bold ideas or mix it up. The best place to try out innovative ideas is usually at the start of your video says Crowdsourcing.org, and cites The Bridge as a good example launching straight into the action, before going to the who, how, when, why of the film project. Be creative – but also test it out on people who will tell you straight up if it works for them (your mum does not count)!

Finally, have some fun – and let your enthusiasm and passion shine through – this project means a lot to you and perhaps exists because of the way you or your friends and family live life. A great example of this is Gotham Bicycle Defense, who created a theft resistant bike light after a friend was hit by car after having his light stolen one night.  Or “Boombot REX Ultraportable Speaker” campaign on Kickstarter , which, as Crowdsourcing.org point out, sells an out-doors lifestyle just as much as the product.

So, with all this in mind, grab that note pad get planning and from Be Inspired Films and VideoKnowHow – best of luck with your crowd-funding video!

Click here to watch the great video that Be Inspired Films created for the Student Hubs’ Emerge conference held at the Skoll Centre.

Connect on social media – @beinspiredfilms and @videoknowhow

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SCHOLAR BLOG: Seeking out the Special and the Valuable

In this series of Scholar Blogs, our four Skoll Scholars for 2014-15 tell us what shaped their journey toward doing an MBA, and give their first impressions of how it feels to be starting their MBA course at Saïd Business School. 

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Nikhil Nair

Nikhil Nair comes to oxford with over 6 years of experience in the solar industry. He spent  three years working at the social enterprise SELCO Solar, and he holds a degree in Business Management from Christ University, India.

Thomas Lawrence asked the class: “Do you think everyone is special?”

Almost all of us put up our hands and said yes. Then he made a simple but powerful statement: “Although everyone may be special, not everyone is valuable”.

In the past few weeks since my arrival in this city, I have established that there are several truly special people at Oxford. Let me share an incidence of meeting one such person.

One evening, the MBA class gathered for wine at the Oxford Museum of Natural History, where I struck up a conversation with Joel and Caryn. Joel was telling me that he planned to try his hand at rowing. Caryn also said she intended to row, not just for her college, but also for the University team. Since rowing is big at Oxford, making it to the University team is extremely competitive. So I stopped and said to Caryn, “Rowing for the University can be extremely competitive I hear. Have you rowed before, and do you have any experience in competitive rowing?” That’s when she said that she has been part of the US Olympic rowing team for the last three times, at London, Bejing and Athens! My jaw dropped. I was bursting with questions:  what was it like to be at the Olympics? How does it feel to represent the country? Did you win? And why in this world would you need an MBA?

Unfortunately I was unable to pick up my dropped-jaw and ask her these questions at the time, but I hope to do so in the course of the year. I at least found an answer to one of the questions through her Wikipedia page: yes she won – a gold at London and Beijing, and a silver at Athens. Caryn to me is a special person. And although my other classmates may not be Olympians, I have realized if you listen, each of them are special through their stories and life experiences.

But do I only want such special people and special experiences? Thomas’ theory in class is helping me differentiate between being special and being valuable. To make the most of this year, I will also need to engage with people and events that are not just special, but extremely valuable to my personal and professional life.

How do I find out what is valuable to me? If I had Aladdin’s magic lamp, I would ask the genie to create for me a list of all the valuable people and events that I could ever experience. But when I think again, perhaps it’s better that this genie doesn’t exist, as the experience of engaging and deciding whether things are special or valuable or both, is the true joy of this one year at Oxford.

Interesting events are happening all the time, such as: a talk by Eric Schmidt from Google, an event by the Smith school on GDP & Businesses, Harry Potter enthusiasts playing Quidditch (yes, this is an actual sport at Oxford), or the former Prime Minister of Pakistan Mr. Gillani speaking about leadership in his country.

While juggling between readings for Strategy class, OBN meetings and late-night BOP parties, I continue to look for events/people that are special and valuable. So that when people ask me about my experience at SBS, I will be able to use the same phrase I have heard from several alumni: “It was the best year of my life!”

 

 

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REFLECTIONS ON: BUILDING A BUSINESS

Building A Business @SBS Lecture #1:  

Professor Constantin-C Coussios, “How to Start A Business”

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“The value of an idea lies in the using of it”-Thomas Edison

On 14 October 2014, Professor Constantin-C. Coussios, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Professorial Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, kicked off The 2014 “Building a Business”  Lecture Series to a packed house in Nelson Mandela Theatre at SBS.

All eyes in the crowd widened in awe as Professor Coussios introduced the two companies he founded during his time in Oxford. The fist of the two, OrganOx Ltd, founded in 2008, has developed a novel normothermic perfusion device for improved liver preservation prior to transplantation through to first-in-man trials and first sales. Following this success, In 2014, Coussios co-founded OxSonics Ltd, which is developing a new generation of ultrasound-based medical devices for drug delivery and minimally invasive surgery.

Following this fascinating summary of his entrepreneurial success in the field of biomedical science,  Professor Coussios moved on quickly and took a universal approach to the advice he offered.  He engaged directly and effectively with the diverse audience by breaking down what he believed were some of the tools necessary to build any type of business.

COUSSIOS TOP 5’s FOR ENTREPRENEURS

Professor Coussios’ explained 5 key questions that everyone thinking of embarking on an entrepreneurial business venture should ask themselves:

  1. Do I have a great idea?
  2. Am I passionate about translating this idea?
  3. Can I handle uncertainty?
  4. Am I investable ?
  5. Can I assemble a great team?

Professor Coussios concluded this lecture on an inspiring note.  Quoting Jeff Bezos on the essence of the entrepreneurial character, he said:  “I knew that if I failed I wouldn’t regret that, but I knew the one thing I might regret is not trying.”

To hear all of Professor Coussios’s top tips, watch his full lecture here.

Building a Business is a nine-week lecture series designed to teach the fundamentals of developing a business. To watch past lectures or find out what’s up next, click here.