, ,

Making Leadership Great Again: Breakthrough Educational Models

Forging Common Ground – Series of Oxford Student Insights to the Skoll World Forum 2017.

Gillian Benjamin, Oxford MBA at the Saïd Business School, shares key takeaways from the  Skoll World Forum session “Making Leadership Great Again: Breakthrough Educational Models”.

In the lunchtime session directly prior to this panel, Bill Drayton, Founder and CEO of Ashoka, implored audience members to help others understand the implications of the new world order in which the repetitive actions of a machinist on a factory floor, or a line manager in a multi-national company, were fast becoming redundant. He highlighted the need for a radically different skill-set and ‘growing up system’ to give young people the competencies needed to thrive in environments of constant and rapid change.

During the panel on ‘Breakthrough Educational Models’ the founders of two innovative institutions, both based in the global South, shared key ingredients of their success.

Fig 1 - Making Leadership Great Again

Jose Zaglul, Co-Founder and former President of EARTH University shared the story of the establishment of the institution he helped set up. The campus, based in Costa Rica, offers an innovative four-year undergraduate programme in agricultural sciences and natural resources management with one crucial difference from ordinary degree programmes – the technical and scientific knowledge gleaned on the course is just one of the four pillars that make up the curriculum. The other three pillars ensure that students leave with a deep social and environmental awareness, the attitudes and values needed to drive change and the lived experience of having set up their own entrepreneurial venture. EARTH has 430 students from 41 countries, 83% of whom are from rural communities.

Hopping across continents to South Africa, co-founded and CEO Chris Bradford shared the story of the African Leadership Academy (ALA), ALA is a two-year pre-university programme based on the UK A-Level system, combined with unique curricula in Entrepreneurial Leadership, African Studies and Writing and Rhetoric. ALA currently has 264 students drawn from 47 African countries, with many graduates going on to study at some of the most prestigious universities around the world before coming back to the continent to drive growth and development. One such example is Moroccan panelist Jihad Hajjouji who is an ALA alumn currently pursuing her MBA at the Stanford Business School.

When discussing the ALA curriculum Bradford stated with respectful veneration that Zaglul was his personal hero and had been a huge inspiration to ALA as they crafted their programme two decades after the formation of EARTH.

Fig 2 - Making Leadership Great Again

Three key lessons can be drawn from the success of these two institutions:

1) Create opportunities for youth leadership

Recruiting students from underserved communities can be challenging as prior academic performance can be a poor shorthand for future potential. Zaglul shared how a track-record of civic action in teenage years helped EARTH identify and recruit the most promising students, many of whom lacked the top grades of their peers from more privileged contexts, but who made up for this through exhibiting tangible leadership capabilities. Such leadership skills, developed through implementing projects to improve their immediate contexts, point to an understanding of their personal agency and a world-view that sees the status quo as malleable and open to improvement through personal action.

Youth social action projects therefore play an important role in the development of young change-makers, and serve as important identifiers to institutions who are driven to recruit talented students from underserved contexts where quality primary and secondary school instruction may be lacking.

2) Put the emphasis on learning, not teaching

Bradford shared a word association game he has tested the world-over: To begin, think of words associated with ‘school’. Then follow the same process for ‘learning’. Having played this game with educators and students from all corners of the globe the results are resoundingly similar:

When asked to think about ‘school’ people mention nouns such as headmaster, teacher, bell and test. ‘Learning’ rarely appears in the top five most-mentioned associations.

When asked about ‘learning’ people talk about things like discovering new skills through stretch experiences and the value of engaging with inspirational mentors to guide them on their journey.

The contrast in the associations is stark and points to the need to explicitly redesign our education apparatus in a way that fosters experiential learning. Bradford calls for a radical re-organisation of how we deliver the educational experience through two key shifts:

  • Educators need to shift from thinking about learning as the delivery of content towards the learning as nurturing the key skills students need to hone.
  • The learning environment needs to shift from a space where the teacher is seen as an imparter of knowledge to a peer-learning space where students learn from one another and the teacher through experiential projects.

Fig 3 - Making Leadership Great Again

3) Inspire teachers to rethink their positions  

Passionate teachers strive to replicate the best classroom experience they had as students and in many contexts this means replicating the best lecturer who had the clearest notes on the board.

To shift to a new norm that truly serves students, institutions need to expose their faculty to radically different versions of best-practice to support them in refashioning outdated ideals they may be striving towards. This involves exposure to new teaching practices to support them re-imagine their roles.

In this regard, moderator Debora Dunn, co-founder of FEED collaborative at Stanford University pointed to the work of The Stanford d.school’s K12 Lab Network which achieves this goal by supporting educators think beyond current school models while concurrently building a community of practitioners to share the best practices that emerge.

She commented, “To tackle the many challenges that stand between us and a just and sustainable world we need a global army of young leaders who combine character, confidence and capability.” The lessons extracted from the work of EARTH and ALA highlight exciting leverage points to help transform education systems from those that merely equip students for repetitive work to those that foster the competencies, care and concern needed in our current socio-economic context.

,

Global Goals for an Uncertain World

Forging Common Ground – Series of Oxford Student Insights to the Skoll World Forum 2017.

Avery Bang, Oxford MBA at the Saïd Business School, shares her insight from the  Skoll World Forum session “Global Goals for an Uncertain World”.

The buzz of the Skoll World Forum is something any attendee is not soon to forget. I look forward to this week every year with excitement for the flood of new ideas, and dread for the lack of sleep and inevitable FOMO (not familiar with FOMO? You clearly haven’t yet studied at Oxford Saïd).

One of the sessions I most looked forward at this year’s Forum was Global Goals for an Uncertain World, moderated by Susan Myers of the United Nations Foundation. I entered to session with a genuine curiosity of how she would lead a conversation about the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through a diverse panel including a Skoll Awardee, a Deputy Minister and an Oxford social entrepreneur. When the session started with a 90 second, dance-move inspiring animated video Turning Plans into Action, my FOMO melted away and I knew I had found my people.

For those who are not familiar, the Sustainable Development Goals (officially known as Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development) are a set of 17 targets to fight inequality and tackle climate change launched in 2016. The SDGs were announced as the United Nations wrapped up the 15-year cycle of the anti-poverty Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and launched the even more ambitious plan to banish a host of social ills by 2030. For those of you that skipped the video animation above, the MDGs got us half way over the last 15 years; the SDGs will get us the ‘rest of the way’ over the next 15.

I personally love audience participation, and really appreciated that the afternoon discussion weaved in each of the panelist’s favorite goals, invoking an audience-wide inquisition of our own (mine is #9 – comment below with yours!). I walked away with a much greater appreciation for a range of issues – access to justice for building effective, accountable and inclusive institutions (goal #16) in particular jumped out. Vivek Maru of Namati, a 2015 Skoll Awardee, painted a story of a world with access to social justice through ensuring all people ‘know law; use law; and shape law’. The panel conversation also shed light on how close several goals were from being cut, and how the world will truly be a different place in 15 years because they weren’t.

Susan framed the session with three main discussion points; how to sustain momentum for the SDG release, particularly in a time of political turnover; how to empower social entrepreneurs to work on SDGs; and how to empower action across all levels. Throughout the conversation, it became clear that there has been a fundamental shift between the MDGs and SDGs – a shift towards aligning international commitments with those right at home.  Elissa Goldberg, the Assistant Deputy Ministry of Global Affairs for Canada shared her government’s commitment to develop their national plan using the SDGs as a framework, and it occurred as something of an ‘ah-ha’ moment for me – how incredible is it that we are all one, operating under one global framework, all aligned towards one (or 17, in this case) common goal. By aligning our domestic agenda with our investments overseas the global community is speaking loudly that there no longer can be an ‘us’ or ‘them’.

One common goal – one common framework – and one incredibly inspiring conversation. After another, after another, after another. With a new common vocabulary that we all can work towards, and within, I believe the SDGs will continue to ensure that social entrepreneurs, policy makers, private sectors players and everyone in between continue to contribute one common direction.

 Follow Avery: @AveryBang

,

Philanthropy for a Fractured World

Forging Common Ground – Series of Oxford Student Insights to the Skoll World Forum 2017.

David Sanders, Oxford MBA at the Saïd Business School, gives his perspective on the Skoll World Forum session, “Philanthropy for a Fractured World”.

On the final morning of the 2017 Skoll World Forum, simultaneous panels were offered on Impact Investing and Philanthropy.  I debated whether to catch up on the latest from the former, with its sex appeal of “profit + purpose”, a proposed new kind of capitalism, or to return to the original solution for affecting positive change: strategic donations.

A simple realisation drew me to Philanthropy for a Fractured World:  the most pressing, extreme problems facing society today do not lend themselves to viable business models, but through giving, these issues can be remedied.

Foundations and family offices are increasingly seeking hybrid organisational models when deploying capital, and I expected the session on philanthropy to at least touch on this growing practice.  Much to my surprise, and relief, on the contrary, the panelists reminded the packed room that philanthropy has a unique, and extremely important role to play in the social impact space.

Panelists at the Skoll World Forum, from philanthropy and government, discuss the role of their organisations in an increasingly polarised society.

Panelists at the Skoll World Forum, from philanthropy and government, discuss the role of their organisations in an increasingly polarised society.

The speakers, who included Lillianne Ploumen from the Government of The Netherlands, Darren Walker from the Ford Foundation, Laleh Ispahani from Open Society Foundations and Pia Infante from the Whitman Institute, discussed their organisations’ respective responses to crises, with significant focus paid to the risks facing women and minorities in the U.S. under a Trump presidency.  Ms. Ploumen’s department has partnered on the #SheDecides campaign, which swiftly raised €183 million to help fill the gap in maternal health provisions following the president’s drastic cuts to Planned Parenthood services.  This initiative, from a foreign government to the U.S., is admirable, but indeed troublesome—it seems the U.S. is entering a period of international reliance for the protection of human rights.

Mr. Walker emphasised the importance of minority representation in leadership positions today, especially where racism and sexism persist, and he also cited specific concerns on the failure of the economy to deliver stable jobs to low-income populations.  These shortcomings, coupled with a shrinking government social mandate, escalates demand for Big Philanthropy.

While the panelists focused more on the role of philanthropy than they did on specific causes, a highlight of the conversation was a recognition that there are causes that span the political spectrum.  Disability issues and criminal justice-reform, to name two, are both values-based issues, and garner support from the right-leaning Koch brothers, and progressive institutions like Open Society Foundations.

The world of giving does grapple with some important questions, however, around its own identity and purpose.  As Mr. Walker acknowledged, philanthropists are incredibly privileged, and it is easy for practitioners to succumb to an ivory tower mentality.  One proposed solution to this, as posed by the distinguished moderator Marc Gunther from Nonprofit Circles, is to democratise the work.  Like shareholders of a public company, who convene regularly to take a voice in key decisions, should not beneficiaries to causes also be gathered to express their views to donors?

In the Trump era, the culture of giving in the U.S. plays an essential role for social progress and human protections.  And it seems, based on the views of those at the Skoll World Forum, philanthropy is stepping into its heightened role with a determined spirit.

Follow David: @DavidSandersUSA

 

,

Media Matters: The Future of News

Forging Common Ground – Series of Oxford Student Insights to the Skoll World Forum 2017.

Andrew Ng, Oxford MBA at the Saïd Business School, gives his perspective on the  Skoll World Forum session “Media Matters: The Future of News”.

In today’s fast paced world, there is high demand for quick news on the go to suit our busy lifestyles. The way we consume news has changed dramatically, at breakneck speed. Just two decades ago, radio, TV and print news dominated this arena. The proliferation of social media platforms has resulted in a democratisation of news; however, this new reach has also brought with it some new and complex challenges.

On Friday, 7 May, the Skoll World Forum 2017 brought together a panel of leading voices in the media industry to discuss the key opportunities and challenges ahead.

Pat Mitchell (Founder & President, Pat Mitchell Media) opened with a sobering reminder of the significance of this conversation: it is not about job preservation; rather, it is about whether we as a global population continue to have open and free access to critical information.

Traditional business models are being disrupted, with leading social media platforms now claiming the lion’s share of revenue from viewership. While quality journalism continues to be a labour-intensive, time-consuming activity, key revenue streams are drying up, creating increased reliance on grants and fundraising. Trust in the media is at an all-time low. The proliferation of “fake news” at an unprecedented pace and scale has led to implications for not just the media industry, but democracy itself. Big data and analytics have been used for nefarious purposes in targeting the voting public, while many media companies are left wondering how to keep up with the pace of technological advancement amidst shrinking resources.

Andrew Jack (Reporter, Financial Times) contrasted the implications of digital and social. Digital has been beneficial, slashing costs and making it easier to engage with readers. Meanwhile, the social side has been more challenged, due to disintermediation. Katharine Viner (Editor-in-Chief, Guardian News & Media, The Guardian) shared how the forces of social media have been tremendously beneficial for readership, but financially detrimental.

The implications and appropriate response for each media provider are different, and majorly dependent on the organisation’s ownership structure and business model. The Guardian has responded by seeking to grow its revenue through the membership scheme and contributions, both of which have found success. With providers like National Public Radio (NPR), the model brings the business community and government together with philanthropy. As Edith Chapin of NPR put it, “in some ways, public media in US is a piñata at the moment”; the audience has a big say. She emphasised the need for keeping financial health by maintaining multiple revenue streams, whether from advertising, corporate or philanthropic sources, and the need for quality content and programming. For example, All Things Considered (ATC), the flagship news program on NPR that premiered in 1971, has offered viewers more than what they get through evening news. Quality journalism calls for investment of time and effort to dig deep into communities and feed insights into strong regional or national approaches.

On issue of financial sustainability, Kinsey Wilson (EVP Product & Tech; Editor, Innovation/Strategy, The New York Times) pointed out how “serious news of quality has always been cross-subsidised.” For example, with newspapers, this was achieved through classified advertising. The future of quality news is likely to involve continued cross-subsidisation, if not re-bundling.

In closing, Edith challenged fellow media providers to “make the best content and fight by showing value in what we are creating… This is the challenge of our lifetime. Let’s take that hill.” Indeed, it is this spirit that fills me with hope for the future of news.

,

Mapping and Measurement: Expanding Systems Entrepreneurship

Forging Common Ground – Series of Oxford Student Insights to the Skoll World Forum 2017.

Alex Fischer, DPhil Candidate at the University of Oxford’s School of Geography and the Environment and member of the Water Programme at the Smith School of Enterprise and Environment Water Programm.e He gives his perspective on the Skoll World Forum session “Systems Entrepreneurship: A How-To Guide for a New Action Paradigm”.

What does it mean to take a systems approach to problem solving and entrepreneurship? This question emerged in multiple sessions at the Skoll World Forum where delegates and speakers traded ideas framing several perspectives and components of systems thinking and complexity.  A delegate-led lunch discussion focused on how to take innovations to system-wide scales, and specifically overcome barriers set by development funding structures and organisational capacity. A second delegate lunch discussion explored how to use system analysis and mapping tools to find leverage points in complex, dynamic systems, such as peacebuilding or the nexus of climate and food systems. The third session argued for a new action paradigm of system entrepreneurs or the coordinated collaboration of actors and funders to drive large-scale system changes such as malaria eradication or education reform.

Further arguing the need for a new approach of system entrepreneurs, Jeff Walker, the Chairman of New Profit, presented five elements for a practical guide to this new action paradigm.  The argument, summarised in an article published the same day in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, opens with the provocation to set up problem-orientated coalitions:

The message is clear: our focus should be more on solving problems through creative collaboration, and less on the establishment and perpetuation of new institutions. In addition, we need to develop and employ system entrepreneurs who are skilled in coordinating systematic approaches to addressing the complex, large-scale problems of our time.”

To achieve this Walker shared five elements in his approach to drive large-scale change:

  1. Identify the issues and think in systems and start by asking “what is the problem”.

“Having a great idea for solving a social problem is just the beginning. You also need to identify the collaborators who can help you translate your innovation into real solutions for the real world.”

  1. Invest in research and analysis to define the context and map the other actors.

Engage in research and analysis to hone your strategy. Figure out what’s really needed—and what works.”

  1. Continuous communication and awareness to convene partners

“The systems change model demands a high level of interaction and transparency between previously unaffiliated individuals and groups. If these links break down, or are never quite formed in the first place, it is unlikely that an effort will succeed.”

  1. Engage with policy to change policy

“If you seek to change a complex system, you will often need to change the laws, administrative rules, and official practices governing that system.”

  1. Measurement and continuous evaluation

“The most successful systems change campaigns create consistent and ongoing data assessments, and rely upon those findings to guide strategy and ensure accountability.”

One common agreement across the different sessions, reinforced by my own research on the role of disruptive information systems within water management institutions, was that success of this approach is contingent on robust data that describes entire systems, not only measuring sub-components, actors or specific interventions.

Dr. Raj Panjabi, CEO of Last Mile Health, posed the question how to set collective Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and related metrics that measure sector-wide successes, and how to incorporate that into the actor-specific evaluation structures. This left a wider challenge for participants to define what outcomes they would measure to provide at a system-level to incentivise collective action while still providing a platform for individual actors, and their funders.

Follow Alex: @alexmfischer

,

Aha! Moments: When I Changed Course

 Forging Common Ground – Series of Oxford Student Insights to the Skoll World Forum 2017.

University of Oxford DPhil student, Luiz Guidi, gives his perspective on the  Skoll World Forum session “Aha! Moments: When I changed course”.

What is the secret to having a good idea? How do those moments of inspiration happen?

For Albert Einstein, the answer lied in thinking in completely different terms as, according to him, “no problem can be solved from the same consciousness that created it.” Searching for inspiration, some people have used psychedelic drugs to let their minds enter new dimensions including, allegedly, a certain Steve Jobs. At the Skoll World Forum yesterday, we decided to time travel using, not drugs (as far as I know), but through personal histories.

Josh Babarinde (Cracked It) take us back to his “aha!” moment.

Josh Babarinde (Cracked It) take us back to his “aha!” moment.

In an inspiring session, six speakers took us back in time and along their journeys of discovery and realisation, through those moments when something clicked in their brains and—aha!— they came up with a solution to the problem they were faced with.

Kennedy Odede (Founder & CEO, Shining Hope for Communities) told us his deeply moving story of struggle and forgiveness in Kibera, and how overcoming the suffering of a friend’s death and a football made him realise how he had to empower himself to help shape the lives of those in his community. Josh Babarinde (Founder and CEO, Cracked It) gave us an insight into how working directly with young offenders in London made him realise the potential for turning their existing social entrepreneurial skills in crime into something positive and desirable for them using technology. Ruth M’Kala (Alum, Global Health Corps) shared her tale of inspiration by the philosophy of justice and human rights, and how that enabled her to unlock her inner motivation to work towards promoting health as a human right.

Building on this, Chuck Slaughter (Founder, Living Goods) told us about how serendipitous encounters and conversations can lead you down to unexpected paths and to discoveries, and about the importance of testing these ideas quickly and cheaply—like when he became an “Avon lady”. Randomness and surprise were also a theme in Julia Ormond’s (Founder & President, Asset Campaign) story, as she realised that things are often very different than you think. For Julia, we must always ask ourselves: what is our own personal contribution to those faulty lines out there? Christine Su (CEO and Co-Founder at PastureMap) told us her history with cheese and how it put her in conflict, physically through causing her hives but also emotionally and ethically with realising how much of our food is still produced.

The connecting theme about all the ‘aha-ness’? It has nothing to do with training your brain or brainstorming playing in climbing walls. Instead, it is by simply being on the front line, experiencing things personally, feeling it for yourself. Through that, not only you can really deeply understand the problem, but you let serendipity play its role. By working directly with the people or the problems at stake, living it in the flesh, our speakers ended up stumbling upon an idea. As Chuck Slaughter put it, “we have a lot less control over our own path than we think.”

But, whilst this session was especially dedicated to it, ‘aha’ moments were everywhere in the Skoll World Forum. Moments of vision and insight have been shared by many throughout the week. And, hopefully, it provided a platform for many other moments of enlightenment, be it fuelled by inspiring stories, exchanges over coffee during the day, or random late night encounters over a beer—which, I suspect, many of us here today now regret drinking.