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Posts Tagged ‘Social Finance’

Opportunities of the Week

October 11th, 2012 No comments

As you may know, term has started and things are getting more exciting everyday here at the Centre.  Part of that excitment has been fueled by opportunities like the ones below.  Feel free to peruse them and see if any are of interest to you!

 

Dr Larry Brilliant is coming to Oxford

Dr Larry Brilliant, President of the Skoll Global Threats Fund, will be speaking  on ‘Pandemics – Can we eliminate major worldwide epidemics?’ on 22 October at 17:30.  To register or for more information click here.

 

Social Finance is Hiring

Social Finance is looking for a new International Development Associate to support its Development Impact Bond work.  Click here for the job description.

 

The Alfa Fellowship Program

Are you interested in working in Russia?  The Alfa Fellowship Program is a professional development program placing American and British citizens in work assignments at leading organizations in Russia in the fields of business, economics, journalism, law, public policy and related areas.  Financial and programmatic support are provided.  Apply by 1 December.

 

Journeys for Change MBA Social Entrepreneurship Journey
Journeys for Change’s inaugural MBA competition will select and support the most exceptional MBA students to catapult their winter break – and MBA – experience by joining the journey of a lifetime.  Apply by 14 October.

 

Women and Manual Trades seeking Interns

Want to help WAMT generate its own income through social business?  If so, apply to intern and help compile a costed Business Plan for the social business(es) WAMT wishes to pursue.  For more information contact Andy Kelmanson, Chief Executive at a.kelmanson@wamt.org.

Watch Dr. Nicholls on SkyNews

March 8th, 2012 No comments

The Skoll Centre’s Alex Nicholls was recently on sabbatical at various social entrepreneurship organisations in Australia. While there, he had the chance to talk to SkyNews on the global nature of social entrepreneurship and its evolution over the last decade.  Hear what he has to say about measuring the impact of social entrepreneurship and the future of social finance markets.  Watch the video here.

The Expanding Impact Investing Ecosystem: ImpactAssets 50

June 21st, 2011 No comments

This post was writen by Skoll Centre Director, Pamela Hartigan.

If you are an investor who has been wooed by impact investing and are looking for solid deals, where do you go?

That was the challenge faced by Ron Cordes, a wealthy New York based entrepreneur who was faced with the prospect of conducting due diligence on a myriad of possible social investment deals – without the time or expertise to do so.  But rather than give up, as many frustrated investors might do, Ron sought the help of the Calvert Foundation and together, launched ImpactAssets last year with capital from Ron Cordes’ Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, and other leading philanthropic and financial services sponsors.

ImpactAssets is a non-profit financial services company (I know that sounds like an oxymoron, but then, think of OneWorld Health, the first US non-profit pharmaceutical company).  It combines both philanthropy and asset management to mobilize capital for social and environmental impact.  At present, it has current assets of US$60 million and offices in San Francisco, New York, Seattle and Bethesda, Maryland.

I happened to be in New York this week and took advantage of a brief respite from meeting- mania to have coffee with my long-time friend and social investment pioneer, Jed Emerson.  In catching up with one another’s professional and personal lives, Jed told me about his involvement in ImpactAssets – which  in addition to him, has drawn upon some of the “greats” in the impact investing field, including Tim Freundlich as its President and as its Chairman, Wayne Silby, the creator of the Calvert Fund and Foundation.

As it turned out, I was serendipitously in the city for the launch of ImpactAssets 50, s a very cool initiative.  In short, Cordes invited a group of impact investing experts, of which Jed is one, to review and select the top 50 fund managers who are taking the best of the for-profit and not-for-profit structures and blending them to yield social, environmental and financial returns.  Criteria for consideration in this blue ribbon group include over three years experience in the impact investing field, a minimum of US$5 million under management, and a demonstrated commitment to social/environmental impact at the portfolio level.

In this way, wealth management advisors have a list of places to start their due diligence in looking for funds for their clients to invest in or products to place in their portfolios.

The full list of the top 50 is available here, online or in pdf.

The launch of ImpactAssets 50 was feted in Ron’s lovely Park Avenue apartment – and it again underscored how despite our sense that this field is expanding, it is still very small.

So many old friends and familiar faces – Asad Mahmood from Deutsche Bank, Jan Piercy from Shorebank International, entrepreneur and philanthropist Josh Mailman, social entrepreneurs Felipe Vergara from Lunmi and Jordan Kassalow from Vision Spring, Anthony Bugg Levine from Rockefeller, Cathy Clark from Duke, and on and on.

It will be exciting to see how ImpactAssets evolves in the coming years, how many fund managers will vie for the privilege of being selected among its Top 50, and how many entrants are spawned to compete with this very promising venture.

Skoll Centre Research Grant Recepients Announced!

June 8th, 2011 No comments

We are pleased to announce the recepients of the Skoll Centre Research Grants.  This newly lauched scheme offers University of Oxford academics and researchers the opportunity to advance knowledge in the field of social entrepreneurship – with this year’s theme specifically focused on finance. It is an area timely and relevant to practitioners and academics alike.

We were so pleased to receive many other quality proposals from across disciples throughout the University. It is a promising sign that the scholary inquiry into finance for social and environmental advancement will only continue to grow and enrichen our understanding of its broad potential.

Congratulations to the recepients, and look out for next year’s research round in early 2012.

Dr Robert Hope, School of Geography and the Environment

Impact, implications and opportunities for mobile phone water payments in Sub-Saharan Africa
A comparative study of the financial and societal implications of water mobile payment initiatives. It will explore:

  • the degree to which mobile banking can boost revenue collection and strengthen the financial base of water service providers
  • the extent to which mobile payments can benefit poor households due the lowering of water payment transaction costs
  • the broader potential of mobile banking platforms to unlock new and innovative models of water provision for the unconnected urban and rural poor in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Sangamitra Ramachander, Department of International Development

Towards a Framework to Assess Credit Risk in the Group Lending Approach to Microfinance
The study aims to develop a tool for practical use in the assessment of credit risk among borrower groups.  It is basedon previous empirical work identifying the three major sources of credit risk in joint liability group lending:

  • risk at the individual level pertaining to socioeconomic status, financial history and family support toward group membershi
  • risk arising from the particular purpose of loan use such as for productive investments, consumption, home construction, repayment of other loans and so on and
  • risk relating to group dynamics – particularly, the mechanism of group formation and levels of group cohesiveness.

This study will incorporate these major sources within a single analytical framework.

Jonathan Greenacre, Law and Finance, Said Business School    

The Regulation of Micro-Banking Industries
This project aims to design a regulatory framework that can be used to  help regulate micro-banking industries.  It will explore whether the principals, rules, and institutions that regulate retail banking industries in developed countries can serve as a guide to build a “hybrid” model of regulation. It will then examine which types of institutions can effectively apply this hybrid model, with cases studies in Cambodia, Kosovo, and Fiji.

EcoEnterprises Fund: Growth capital for sustainable businesses

June 7th, 2011 No comments

There is no denying the prevalence and prominence of the impact investing discourse these days.  A hot topic? Absolutely.  A brand new conversation?  Not even close.

So, when you can hear from one of the early pioneers of the industry, it is always insightful.

This week we hosted Tammy Newmark and Michele Pena of EcoEnterprises Fund who joined us as part of the Skoll Centre Speakers Series.  They have been investing growth capital in sustainable businesses in Latin America for over a decade – and have the battle wounds to prove it.

Not that it’s been all setbacks and scars — but because they simply are open and transparent about the challenges they (and other risk-taking impact investors) have faced over the past 10 years.

Set up in 2000, EcoEnterprises Fund provides long-term investment capital and business advisory services – one without the other would be ineffectual and downright bad business, they say.   The Fund has invested in 23 companies from ecolodges to organics, sustainable forestry to aquaculture. Most of these investments have been wildly successful (20 companies still in operation, 11% p.a. return, and most importantly, measurable social and environmental impact) but of course, there have been challenges.

Which is no surprise, seeing that they are injecting risk capital into companies that are, well, risky.  They bet on the companies that are first-movers and market makers, whose products and services have yet to gain market acceptance.  As such, they are cultivating new demand and a vibrant marketplace that moves these eco-enterprises from the outskirt to the mainstream.

What’s next for EcoEnterprises Fund? Be on the look out for their book  this fall called “Portfolio for the Planet”, which is an open playbook to their tools, indicators and investment cases.  Also, they are currently raising $30 million for a new fund EcoE II, which will target 10-12 small and growing community-based businesses via mezzanine investment instruments.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I399juYovw0&feature=youtu.be]

Diving Deep, Crossing Boundaries: A SOCAP WrapUp

June 2nd, 2011 No comments

This post was written by SBS MBA Nikhil Neelakantan, who has just returned to Oxford after 3 days at SOCAP/Europe.

Courtesy of twentytwentystudios

Last night’s six-member panel brought SOCAP/Europe to an appropriate end.

The panel consisted of social entrepreneurs, volunteers and the founding members of SOCAP/Europe, Kevin Jones and Frank van Beuningen. This was typical of the conference: people from all backgrounds brought together by an interest and passion for impact investing.

This resulted in conversations that frequently needed translation (No, structured banking does not deal with the architecture of banks!) but it also meant that people were exposed to different points of view.

This also meant that there was space for a deep-dive into the details of impact investing as well as an opportunity to learn about innovative organizations using SMS technology in developing countries.

Another feature of the conference were the participant-driven Open Space sessions. I was able to attend two of these sessions, which were “held” in an Unconference format. The first described the work of the World Bank in creating the Development Marketplace. The World Bank Institute created the Development Marketplace over 12 years ago to provide grants to innovative social ventures. Now it is looking to help these social entrepreneurs get commercial investments.

The second Open Space session that I attended was built around the question of providing financing to SME’s trying to build businesses in rural India. We had participants who were eager to start asking questions of those who had already built these links in India. The consensus was that there was lots of opportunity but that one had to proceed by developing partnerships with Indians who were already working in this space (this includes government agencies such as IDBI).

The conference also brought some reflection on the future of SOCAP/Europe. Where is it going next? It seems logical that it will stay physically in Amsterdam (The Dutch have $7bn invested by retail investors in social enterprises through organizations like Triodos Bank and Oikocredit. They are surely the world’s epicenter in social investment).

However will the format remain the same? Will more policy makers and government entities get involved? Despite the lingering questions, we left the conference buoyed by the fact that we were setting the foundation for a larger group of people who were willing to venture forward into the brave new world of impact investing.