Posts

, ,

Back on the other side of the classroom

Alex Shapland-Howes is a 2016-17 Skoll Scholar and is leading the way for social mobility within the UK’s deprived communities.  After his early career as a teacher, he discovers what it’s like to be on the other side of the classroom again at Saïd Business School!

It’s been almost ten years since I was last a full-time student. Having worked in education ever since, it felt a bit odd to go back to the other side of the classroom in our first week.

We are working towards a day where a child’s background doesn’t limit their future options

I’ve spent the last five years leading the expansion of the education charity – Future First. We are working towards a day where a child’s background doesn’t limit their future options. In the UK, we have one of the lowest levels of social mobility in the developed world. The correlation between parents’ earnings and those of their children remains stubbornly close.

Alex being interviewed on UK channel, ITV News.

Alex being interviewed on UK channel, ITV News.

The problem is incredibly complex, but one key challenge is that young people from less advantaged backgrounds are less likely to have positive role models in the world of work. Half don’t know anyone with a job they’d like to do themselves and a quarter goes as far as to say that ‘people like them’ don’t succeed in life.

By helping state secondary schools reconnect with their alumni, Future First is changing those statistics.

Having grown up in the same place and had some of the same teachers, former students can have a transformative effect on the lives of today’s young people – volunteering to deliver careers talks, act as a mentor, or support the teaching of a lesson related to their job.

Over the last five years, we’ve expanded the organisation to work with more than 10% of all secondary schools across the country. Even more excitingly, we’re starting to see the growth of alumni networks beyond our own work.

Our aim is to lead the creation of a genuinely national culture of alumni engagement. Every young person deserves a role model they can relate to, regardless of their background.

I started to look for opportunities for professional development…I wanted to learn what the textbook says about leading teams, developing long-term strategies and running efficient organisations.

Whilst we’ve had great success in growing the organisation and its impact, I started to look for opportunities for professional development about 18 months ago. Perhaps inevitably, we didn’t get everything right, but having moved straight from being a secondary school teacher myself to leading an organisation like Future First, I wanted to learn what the textbook says about leading teams, developing long-term strategies and running efficient organisations.

I came across the Skoll Scholarship by luck, but as soon as I saw it I knew I wanted to apply. I feel incredibly privileged to have the chance to spend a year learning from the world-class experts, reflecting on my own leadership journey and working with amazing people from all over the world. (And they really have been amazing and from all over the world!). There’s not a chance I’d have had been able to do this without the support of the Skoll Centre.

It’s clear from the first few weeks that it’s going to be hard work, but I feel unbelievably lucky to have this opportunity and I can’t wait to carry on making the most of it.

For more information about the Skoll Scholarship, visit skollscholarship.org.

Save

Save

SOCAP Report: What Layer Cakes have to do with Social Finance

This post was written from SBS MBA Nikhil Neelakantan, dosage live from SOCAP/Europe in Amsterdam.

What does a recipe for a layered cake have to do with impact investing?

I would have said “nothing”. That is, healing until I attended the session titled “Layer Cake Deals”. This panel featured speakers from organizations like Triodos Bank (old hands at impact investing) and ABN Amro (a relative newcomer to the field).

According to the panel, medical “layer cakes” are created by putting funders with different priorities in the mixing bowl.  That means funders providing grants, subsidies and soft debt can work with risk-taking venture impact investors to create bigger, faster and more scalable solutions to some of the world’s biggest problems.

Triodos Investment Management has developed a fund that adopts this structure to fund agricultural entrepreneurs in the developing world.  Governments and social investors form the first layer of the cake, providing external guarantees against  default. Social investors seeking lower returns form the second layer, providing subordinated debt. Triodos Bank provides the final layer with a commercial credit line (which it is comfortable doing, partly because of its confidence in the other layers).

However there is a darker side to layer cake deals. The senior debtors are those who often receive the lowest returns. This can partly be explained by the fact that donor agencies and other social investors are willing  to fund high-risk ventures in order to bring in more mainstream funding, therefore providing a “multiplier effect”.   Thus, how to balance the different “ingredients” of the layered cake is a discussion certain come up at impact-investing conferences and offices of funders across the world.

SBSers everywhere

SOCAP has made realize once again that Saïd Business School is extremely well represented in the impact investing space.

I have met practitioners, speakers and leaders of social enterprises who are alumni of the Business School. Some of my “networking time” was spent swapping stories with other SBS’ers about everything from rowing to exams (Am I glad that we don’t have to come back for exams in August that cover material taught over one year!)

My classmates – including budding entrepreneurs building social enterprises in Chad and India – are also representing SBS at SOCAP.  I am impressed by the reach of this strong and cohesive group of former and current students – and I am looking forward to being part of this contingent in the years to come.

Debating the future of social finance at the house of lords

This post was written by Elizabeth Ritchey, member of the SBS  2010-2011 MBA class, and co-chair of the Social Finance OBN.

What's the future of social finance in the UK?: MBAs outside the House of Lords

On May 24th the Social Finance OBN (Oxford Business Network) and the Social Entrepreneurship OBNs teamed up for a joint trip down to London to visit the House of Lords.

Tim Jones, the Social Entrepreneurship sector consultant for SBS, hosted a lively panel discussion on the current state of Social Finance and Entrepreneurship.

The panel consisted of

We discussed everything from social impact bonds to how to build a sustainable future to getting back to the fundamentals of ‘social’.  After the panel we were treated to an insider’s tour of the House of Lords by Lord Mawson and Baroness Steadman-Scott.

It was a wonderful afternoon packed with ‘social’ of all forms. Thank you again to Tim Jones for making it possible!